Akhenaten and the Religion of Light

Akhenaten, Nefertiti and their three eldest da...

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“The Aten was actually not the sun disk, but rather the light that is in the sun and which, radiating from it, calls the world to life and keeps it alive.” (page 54)

There have been so many scholars that have said “Aten is the sun” worshipped by Akhnaten’s people, as if we worship the sun itself!

The quote is from the book Akhenaten and the Religion of Light by Eric Hornung.

The Great Hymn to Aten and Psalm 104

Banquet scene, Huya's tomb, El-Amarna. Akhenat...

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There is no longer any doubt the Hebrew word “Adon” (Lord) is from the ancient Egyptian “Aten” or “Aton” as it is spelled by some scholars. The name “Aten” also closely resmbles the Hebrew word “Adonai” which means “my Lord” - the root being “Adon.”

Many have pointed out the numerous similarities between the Hebrew or Aramaic hymn Psalm 104 and the Great Hymn to Aten composed by Akhenaten. Psalm 104 is attributed to the great Prophet Moses, who has also been identified as none other than Akhenaten (Akhnaten) himself.

While the sun is used as a symbol to represent God in many cultures, Aten is neither the sun nor is He the “sun god” as some have erroneously suggested.

The Scriptures use the symbol of the sun as representing God. Notice how the Psalmist describes the attributes of God:

“Who coverest thyself with light as with a garment; Who stretchest out the heavens like a curtain. Who layeth the beams of his chambers in the waters. Who maketh the clouds his chariot; Who walketh on the wings of the wind; Who maketh winds his messengers; flames of fire his ministers (Psalm 104:2,3)

It should be noted that the sun itself was not worshipped by the faithful monotheistic Egyptians or Hebrews, but it was served as a ruling deity by the polytheists among other ancient Egyptians.

Ancient Egyptians and hard arteries

heart with coronary arteries

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I found an interesting article related to how ancient Egyptians had hard ateries like many people in the world today.

The article, found on MedPage Today says a study was conducted on Egyptians mummies dating back to nearly 4,000 years.

The article says, “Of the 44 mummies found with remaining vascular tissue, 20 of them (45%) had probable or definite arterial calcification on CT scanning….One mummy, that of Princess Ahmose Meyret Amon, who lived between 1580 and 1550 BC, had atherosclerosis in each vascular bed. She died in her early 40s.”

I guess not too much has changed in 4,000 years when it comes to eating habits.